Liberto Therapy, LLC

For Appointments Call: (561) 582-2306

Thomas Liberto, LMT
Advanced Treatment for Muscular Pain and Disorders
Auto, Work, Sports Injuries, Chronic Pain

Sartorius, Gracilis and Semitendinosis

A/K/A: The Pes Ansirinus
 
The most important (periostial) pain point in the lower extremity is the pes anserinus on the tibia. Warren I. Hammer, DC, MS, DABCO

This trio of muscles function as medial knee stabilizers. But, because of their attachments on the pelvis, they also can be factors in hip and lower back pain. They attach to the tibia-the more medial (Big Toe side) of the two lower leg bones. A hypertonicity (too tight) or hypotonicity (too loose) will result in an inward or outward rotation (turning) of the tibia. This not only stresses the inner knee joint, but, because the lower end of the tibia becomes the inner ankle bone (malleolus), an inward or outward tibial rotation will result in changes in the arch of the foot.

When the foot doesn’t move correctly, the knee doesn’t move correctly, the hip doesn’t move correctly, the lower spine and the contralateral (opposite) shoulder doesn’t move correctly, the neck pays the price. So, you end up with foot bunions and pain, medial meniscus, hip/sacroiliac joint and lower back pain along with an incorrect gait. This, along with the resulting trouble in the opposite shoulder and arm!

Gait: according to Danenberg, the average person takes over two thousand strides per limb per day. When we walk, our left leg/right arm move forward and vice versa. When a person compensates when walking due to knee, foot, etc pain, the contralateral arm and shoulder don’t swing properly. This can result in shoulder and neck involvements.

In this seminar you will learn and appreciate how an involvement of the pes ansirinus (“goose foot”) has effects not only on the knee, but also on the foot, hip and lower back. You will learn how to identify the need to address this condition by visual as well as kinesthetic means.

Please know the Origin, Insertion and Actions of the following muscles:

  • Sartorius
  • Gracilis
  • Semitendinosis
  • Popliteus
  • Psoas

I am looking forward to sharing this knowledge with you!

Thomas Liberto, LMT

For Additional Information or Scheduling:

Thomas Liberto, LMT

309 Lake Avenue

Lake Worth, FL 33460

Telephone: 561-582-2306

Email: thomas@libertotherapy.com